Thursday, March 30, 2006

Go George Mason!

Since the Indiana schools are out of the NCAA Tourney, and my bracket is shot to pieces, I'm now pulling for George Mason. It's not on Cinderella grounds. It's on ideology. From the Washington Times:
Established first as a University of Virginia offshoot in 1957 and then as an independent university in 1972, George Mason boomed with the population of Northern Virginia and now is the largest university in the state with an enrollment of nearly 30,000.

The school -- named the most diverse in the country by the Princeton Review this year -- has campuses in Arlington, Fairfax and Prince William counties.

and
The university also is known as a haven for libertarian political thought, with a number of professors -- mainly in the economics and law departments -- who stress the principles of libertarianism, which champions individual freedom.

"George Mason is classified as a school where there are some libertarian professors, and that makes it somewhat unusual," said David Boaz, executive vice president of the Cato Institute in the District. "There are a lot of colleges not welcoming to libertarians and conservatives."

George Mason boasts two Nobel Prize laureates as professors, James Buchanan and Vernon Smith, who both won their awards in the field of economic sciences.

However, the school's namesake is still the original source of Patriot pride.

George Mason, one of America's Founding Fathers, wrote the Virginia Declaration of Rights, which Thomas Jefferson used as a model for the Bill of Rights.

George Mason doen't get the attention that others, such as Washington, Jefferson, Madison, or Monroe get. Not being an early President, as these others were, makes it so. His refusal to sign the original Constitution also makes it so. He objected on the lack of a statement of rights. Of course, The Bill of Rights was later added as Amendments one through ten, justifying his grounds. Short bio.

GO GMU!!!

1 comment:

ed said...

I keep seeing people say Jefferson wrote the Bill of Rights. Are they speaking of the French version? (and he did much on theirs I do believe)